Top 5 Choices For Best Bass Fuzz Pedal

I love the tone that a little bit of fuzz effect can give to a bass sound. We have look at at a bunch of different bass fuzz pedals and picked the following five that we feel are the best of the bunch. Take a look!

1. MXR M84 Bass Fuzz Deluxe

I have been a guitarist for a while and something that I noticed with most audiences that we played for is their love for powerful wrecking ball like bass. This wonderful sound can only be produced by a powerful instrument. Such an instrument seems to introduce new musical elements that even the most experienced guitarist have never noticed before. And the instrument guilty for producing such powerful bass is the MXR M84 Bass Fuzz Deluxe. Here is a review of this pedal.

The first thing that caught my eyes when I first saw this pedal was its elegant classic design. This pedal is housed in a small case that features a funky sports copper sparkle coat. The M84 can be powered by either a standard Boss-style AC adapter and has a true-bypass switching.

The Bass Fuzz Deluxe also plays wonderfully. With most bass pedals, I often experienced a loss in the low end especially when I kicked on a fuzz box. To solve this I used to run one amp clean and one amp dirty, which resulted in splitting the signal into two separate rigs. Doing this was cumbersome and required a lot of experience. But the MXR M84 Bass Fuzz Deluxe solved this particular problem by allowing the player to dial back the degree of dirt by turning the blend knob and by offering individual dry and wet controls. Other features of this pedal include fuzz controls for adjusting the degree of saturation and tone that works with high-frequency roll-off.

The M84 has a ton of awesome features that you will love. Therefore, get it and try it.

2. Red Witch Zeus Bass Fuzz

If you are looking for a bass producing machine, then the Red Witch Zeus Bass Fuzz is the device for you. This pedal does not disappoint. It is powerful, versatile, and has an impressive range. I got the opportunity to use it and here is its review.

The Zeus has four control knobs that are deceptively simple and that can also be tweaked. These controls include two foot and two toggle switches. The foot switches have internal trimpots that control the output of octave and fuzz effects. One of the toggle switches serves the purpose of increasing fuzz’s gain and the other increase the output of tremble. Also, the pedal has a sub octave function. This function is controlled by the Octave Mix knob. This knob determines the amount of fuzz effect that is in the signal. To control the strength and texture of the fuzz, all you have to do is adjust the Sputter control.

One thing I loved about this pedal is the fact that the low-end signal really thickens when you turn the Fuzz control up. The Sputter control gives you a dynamic and lovely tone by poking holes in its girth when rolled back from the fully clockwise position. By using the sputter and full-up fuzz controls, I was able to dish out a rich ’70s funk tone, and when I added the Mix control, I achieved a clean low fuzz tone, similar to that of the ’60s, which is evidence of its versatility.

I also found the chrome finish of this pedal very gorgeous and appealing. Therefore, the Red Witch Zeus Bass Fuzz is a pedal that is worth the time of any serious guitarist.

3. Mooer MFZ4 Fog Bass Fuzz

A terrific way which to use the Pedal is in usage with a wet-dry mix; ordinary in most studios. The product, in and of itself, does not possess a wet-dry mix, when it is put to use, in-line from the instrument to the AMP.

I reasoned, too, quite logically, that if the Squish is turned up a bit too far; this pedal filters it–slightly.

There is a great bottom end once the pedal is engaged or turned on. The size is about right–I think; however, I inwardly wished I might turn down the fuzziness a bit. However, the preceding stated, the wet-dry mix on my amp is used for fuzz—so there is really no issue—after all.

(By the way, the wet/dry mix is used in order to determine, proportion-wise, the mix between the original, which is considered Dry, and the Effected, referred to as Wet, with regard to signals. As stated above, the wet/dry mix is what is, generally, used in most recording studios, in way of processing or software–and again, there are no issues with using the pedal when it comes to fuzz–I can use my amp to address it.

Mooer MFZ4 Fog Bass Fuzz Distortion Effects Pedal is not pricey. The price, therefore, in my opinion, is really quite reasonable–and where I purchased it, shipping was free of charge. My vendor of choice is located online.

The pedal has a nice fuzzy distortion to it. It adds a great deal of positive effect to the bass lines. The pedal, if I have any reason to complain, in the least, does not run on nine volt batteries; however, that said, the issue is easily resolved, by making use of a Dan electrode daisy chain. As far as tonal quality, when adjusting the squeeze too greatly, the consequence of the action, comes by way of cutting out some of the frequencies.

Product features follow:

– The classic tonal quality of bass fuzz, sounds exceptional, on that of a guitar (too);
– The SQUEEZE knob is useful in creating a fuzz tonal quality that is highly unique;
– The shell of the product is made of metal;
– It is quite small and provides the user with refinement due to its smallness; and,
– True by-pass.

4. Dr Green Bearded Lady Bass Fuzz

Ashdown isn’t always a household name when it comes to engineering and manufacturing pedals. The company does produce some of the highest quality bass pedals on the market, though. The Dr Green Bearded Lady Fuzz Pedal For Bass is one of the best sounding fuzz pedals on the bass market today.

The fuzz pedal has a lot of the same great qualities that analog fuzz pedals from other companies have. It provides more when it comes to tonal options, though. The Dr Green Bearded Lady Fuzz Pedal For Bass gives users the option more options when it comes to how they control their tone. This is a great resource for the bass player that wants fuzz but plays a variety of different styles during the course of their show.

The tone can be split into high and low frequencies. I noticed that I could adjust the amount of phase in each frequency range on the instrument. This is a welcome option after playing on fuzz pedals that sound great but are too overbearing it certain ranges on the instrument.

The Bearded Lady has 1/4″ ins and outs. The pedal also is true bypass. This means then when it is not in use it will not add any noise to the signal that is going to your amp. There are 4 different knobs on the pedal. Two of them the control the amount of fuzz in the hi range and what the volume of that range will be. The other controls the same thing in the lower frequencies.

5. Hartke HPHF44 Bass Fuzz Pedal

Hartke is most widely known for being a world leader in the production of bass cabinets. Some of the most famous bass players in the world have been seen utilizing Hartke bass cabinets on stage on some of the world’s biggest stages. The company has also been known to produce some great pedals as well for bass players. The Hartke HPHF44 Bass Fuzz Pedal is a great example of this.

This pedal gives bass players the vintage fuzz tone that they are looking for at an affordable price. This pedal won’t give you the grainy digital distortion that is commonly associated with other bass fuzz pedal. The first thing that I noticed when I plugged in was how warm and round the tone is. It is truly one of the best sounding fuzz pedals on the market today. With a name like Hartke behind it, you know that it can be trusted.

The pedal is completely analog. This is surprising considering how low the price is. There are no digital parts or components. It has 1/4″ inputs and outputs, so it is easy to include in any pedal set up. The pedal comes standard with a 9-volt power adapter. It can also be run with a 9-volt battery. This pedal packs a lot of punch for its size and price. It should be included in the pedal chain of any bass player that wants to truly rock. Hartke has hit another homerun with the HPHF44 fuzz pedal.

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